Exhibitions

The Middle Ages are an interesting epoch in the history of Europe, which lasted from the 5th to the 15th century. It began with the fall of the Western Roman Empire and lasted until the era of the Renaissance and great discoveries. The Middle Ages lie between antiquity and modernity from the perspective of the traditional division of European history. The medieval era is divided into three periods: the Early Middle Ages, the High Middle Ages, and the Late Middle Ages.

The culture of medieval prints is interesting in many ways. One of them is that we often do not know anything about the characters presented on the engraving. When it all starts to shift, crumble, break down in a deliberate, constructive way, we start trying to recognize and asking who is there, what is it for and what it is supposed to mean. When culture and religion crash, we pay more attention to it.

The exhibition presents the results of initial research on the post-digital etching phenomenon. The work enters into a dialogue with the motifs and lines of medieval woodcuts by master Albrecht Durer - a fundamental pillar in the culture of the graphic art world. Themes of the engravings are mainly taken from books and religious motifs from various collections (1488-1505).
About 60 original graphic works are displayed in the Savchenko Gallery. In this series, the author discusses and confronts the Middle Ages to the contemporary culture of everyday life, the culture of algorithms, computer control of numerical devices, and time. As a result, he receives an etching, which is partially generated by means of computer code in the Processing space and hand drawing. The memory of the culture and aesthetics of paper and prints have a chance to continue their existence in the post-digital world of the coexistence of tradition and technology.
Also, as part of the project "Generative Middle Ages - Basics", a limited publication with original graphics in the form of a print-portfolio in the edition of 15 copies was created. Each box is unique and contains 14 unique hand-printed engravings.